J Nephropathol. 2017;6(4):338-345.
doi: 10.15171/jnp.2017.54

Scopus id: 85036518416
  Abstract View: 1862
  PDF Download: 820

Original Article

Gender differences in response to vitamin E and C in gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats

Tahereh Safari 1 * , Saideh Miri 1, Omid Ghofran 1, Fatemeh Fereidooni 1, Abbass Ali Niazi 2, Hossein Bagheri 3, Mehdi Nematbakhsh 4

1 Department of Physiology, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran
2 Department of Pathology, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran
3 Department of Medical English, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Iran
4 Water and Electrolytes Research Center & Department of Physiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
*Corresponding author: Tahereh Safari, Ph.D; Email: tahereh_safari@ yahoo.com

Abstract

Background: Nephrotoxicity is the most recognized side effect of gentamicin. Vitamin
E and vitamin C demonstrate their effective role in the prevention of nephrotoxicity.
Likewise, previous studies have suggested that women have low risk of end-stage renal
disease at premenopausal period.

Objectives: This study aims to investigate the possibility of any gender difference in response
to antioxidant effects vitamins E and C in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.
Materials and Methods: Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups each including both
male and female rats. The first and second groups received saline (control group) and
almond oil, the third group received gentamicin. The fourth group received a regular
dose of gentamicin + vitamin E. Similarly, the fifth group received a regular dose of
gentamicin + vitamin C. The sixth group received a dose of gentamicin + vitamin C and
E simultaneously constantly. This protocol continued for 9 days.

Results: Gentamicin increased significantly urea, creatinine (Cr) and malondialdehyde
(MDA), but it decreased superoxidase dismutase (SOD) level (P < 0.05). Treatment with
antioxidant vitamins improved urea, creatinine, MDA, and SOD serum level significantly
in both genders (P <0.05). Likewise, kidney MDA level enhanced significantly (P <0.05)
and treatment with antioxidant vitamins reduced MDA level too (P <0.05). Gentamicin
decreased kidney SOD activity in male and female rats (P <0.05). However, treatment with
antioxidant vitamins did not improve its level in male rats, while in female rats, vitamins
E and C compensated for kidney SOD activity.

Conclusions: Antioxidant vitamins modified gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in both
genders, with some difference in response to vitamins E and C between the genders, that
was higher in female rats.

Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:

In this experimental study, 92 adult Wistar rats made the subject of the study. Antioxidant vitamins modified gentamicininduced
nephrotoxicity in both genders. However, it is noteworthy that this effect is higher in female rats.

Please cite this paper as: Safari T, Nematbakhsh M, Miri S, Ghofran O, Fereidooni F, Niazi AA, Bagheri H. Gender differences
in response to vitamin E and C in gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats. J Nephropathol. 2017;6(4):338-345. DOI:
10.15171/jnp.2017.54.

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Submitted: 11 Mar 2017
Accepted: 03 Aug 2017
First published online: 09 Jun 2017
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