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J Nephropathol. 2014;3(3): 91-97.
doi: 10.12860/jnp.2014.18
PMID: 25093156
PMCID: PMC4119329
Scopus ID: 84925183130
  Abstract View: 2721
  PDF Download: 1436

Short-Review

Obesity and kidney protection

Aravind Chandra, Michael Biersmith, Ramin Tolouian*

1 Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA
*Corresponding Author: Corresponding author: Ramin Tolouian, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Eastern Virginia Medical School, VA, USA. , Email: tolouir@evms.edu

Abstract

Context: Obesity, both directly and indirectly, increases the risk for a variety of disease conditions including diabetes, hypertension, liver disease, and certain cancers, which in turn, decreases the overall lifespan in both men and women. Though the cardiovascular risks of obesity are widely acknowledged, less often identified is the relationship between obesity and renal function.

Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched.

Results: The concept of the "Metabolic Syndrome" helps us to understand this close link between obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and renal dysfunction. An elevated body mass index has shown to be one of the major determinants of glomerular hyperfiltration that lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. Interestingly, weight loss can lead to attenuation of hyperfiltration in severely obese patients suggesting a possible therapeutic option to combat obesity-related hyperfiltration.

Conclusions: Various treatment strategies had been suggested to decrease impact of obesity on kidneys. These are blood pressure controling, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis, improving glycemic control, improving dyslipidemia, improving proteinuria and lifestyle modifications. Regardless of the numerous pharmacotherapies, the focus should be on the root cause: obesity.


Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:

Obesity, both directly and indirectly, decreases the overall lifespan in both men and women. The concept of the "Metabolic Syndrome" helps us to understand this close link between obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and renal dysfunction. More research, education and change in health policy are needed to embark to the obesity as a root causes of these problems.

Please cite this paper as: Chandra A, Biersmith M, Tolouian R. Obesity and kidney protection. J Nephropathol. 2014; 3(3): 91-97. DOI: 10.12860/jnp.2014.18

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Revision: 11 May 2014
ePublished: 01 Jul 2014
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